Saturday, 30 May 2009

Download: "Flower Fables" by Louisa May Alcott

To download the book, click here.


Contents

The Frost King: or, The Power of Love
Eva's Visit to Fairy-Land
The Flower's Lesson
Lily-Bell and Thistledown
Little Bud
Clover-Blossom
Little Annie's Dream: or, The Fairy Flower
Ripple, the Water-Spirit
Fairy Song



FLOWER FABLES.



THE summer moon shone brightly down upon the sleeping earth, while far away from mortal eyes danced the Fairy folk. Fire-flies hung in bright clusters on the dewy leaves, that waved in the cool night-wind; and the flowers stood gazing, in very wonder, at the little Elves, who lay among the fern-leaves, swung in the vine-boughs, sailed on the lake in lily cups, or danced on the mossy ground, to the music of the hare-bells, who rung out their merriest peal in honor of the night.

Under the shade of a wild rose sat the Queen and her little Maids of Honor, beside the silvery mushroom where the feast was spread.

"Now, my friends," said she, "to wile away the time till the bright moon goes down, let us each tell a tale, or relate what we have done or learned this day. I will begin with you, Sunny Lock," added she, turning to a lovely little Elf, who lay among the fragrant leaves
of a primrose.

With a gay smile, "Sunny Lock" began her story.

"As I was painting the bright petals of a blue bell, it told me this tale."




THE FROST-KING:
OR,
THE POWER OF LOVE.



THREE little Fairies sat in the fields eating their breakfast; each among the leaves of her favorite flower, Daisy, Primrose, and Violet, were happy as Elves need be.

The morning wind gently rocked them to and fro, and the sun shone warmly down upon the dewy grass, where butterflies spread their gay wings, and bees with their deep voices sung among the flowers; while the little birds hopped merrily about to peep at them.

On a silvery mushroom was spread the breakfast; little cakes of flower-dust lay on a broad green leaf, beside a crimson strawberry, which, with sugar from the violet, and cream from the yellow milkweed, made a fairy meal, and their drink was the dew from the flowers' bright leaves.

"Ah me," sighed Primrose, throwing herself languidly back, "how warm the sun grows! give me another piece of strawberry, and then I must hasten away to the shadow of the ferns. But while I eat, tell me, dear Violet, why are you all so sad? I have scarce seen a happy face since my return from Rose Land; dear friend, what means it?"

Thursday, 28 May 2009

Download: "Little Men" by Louisa May Alcott

Click here to download the book.





Little Men

by Louisa May Alcott




TO
FREDDY AND JOHNNY,
THE LITTLE MEN
TO WHOM SHE OWES SOME OF THE BEST AND HAPPIEST
HOURS OF HER LIFE,
THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED
BY THEIR LOVING
"AUNT WEEDY"




Contents

CHAPTER I. NAT
CHAPTER II. THE BOYS
CHAPTER III. SUNDAY
CHAPTER IV. STEPPING-STONES
CHAPTER V. PATTY PANS
CHAPTER VI. A FIRE BRAND
CHAPTER VII. NAUGHTY NAN
CHAPTER VIII. PRANKS AND PLAYS
CHAPTER IX. DAISY'S BALL
CHAPTER X. HOME AGAIN
CHAPTER XI. UNCLE TEDDY
CHAPTER XII. HUCKLEBERRIES
CHAPTER XIII. GOLDILOCKS
CHAPTER XIV. DAMON AND PYTHIAS
CHAPTER XV. IN THE WILLOW
CHAPTER XVI. TAMING THE COLT
CHAPTER XVII. COMPOSITION DAY
CHAPTER XVIII. CROPS
CHAPTER XIX. JOHN BROOKE
CHAPTER XX. ROUND THE FIRE
CHAPTER XXI. THANKSGIVING


CHAPTER I. NAT

"Please, sir, is this Plumfield?" asked a ragged boy of the man who opened the great gate at which the omnibus left him.

"Yes. Who sent you?"

"Mr. Laurence. I have got a letter for the lady."

"All right; go up to the house, and give it to her; she'll see to you, little chap."

The man spoke pleasantly, and the boy went on, feeling much cheered by the words. Through the soft spring rain that fell on sprouting grass and budding trees, Nat saw a large square house before him a hospitable-looking house, with an old-fashioned porch, wide steps, and lights shining in many windows. Neither curtains nor shutters hid the cheerful glimmer; and, pausing a moment before he rang, Nat saw many little shadows dancing on the walls, heard the pleasant hum of young voices, and felt that it was hardly possible that the light and warmth and comfort within could be for a homeless "little chap" like him.

"I hope the lady will see to me," he thought, and gave a timid rap with the great bronze knocker, which was a jovial griffin's head.

A rosy-faced servant-maid opened the door, and smiled as she took the letter which he silently offered. She seemed used to receiving strange boys, for she pointed to a seat in the hall, and said, with a nod:

"Sit there and drip on the mat a bit, while I take this in to missis."

Nat found plenty to amuse him while he waited, and stared about him curiously, enjoying the view, yet glad to do so unobserved in the dusky recess by the door.


Wednesday, 27 May 2009

Download: "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott

To download the book, click here.


Little Women
Part One

"Chapter" I.1
Playing Pilgrims
"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents," grumbled Jo,lying on the rug.
"It's so dreadful to be poor!" sighed Meg, looking down at her olddress.
"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have plenty of prettythings, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injuredsniff.
"We've got Father and Mother, and each other," said Beth contentedlyfrom her corner.
The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at thecheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly, "We haven't gotFather, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhapsnever," but each silently added it, thinking of Father far away, where thefighting was.
Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You knowthe reason Mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas wasbecause it is going to be a hard winter for everyone; and she thinks weought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in thearmy. We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought todo it gladly. But I am afraid I don't" And Meg shook her head,as shethought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

Tuesday, 26 May 2009

Download: Aesop's Fables

Click here if you want to download Aesop's Fables.


THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

WOLF, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf’s right to eat him. He thus addressed him:

“Sirrah, last year you grossly insulted me.”

“Indeed,” bleated the Lamb in a mournful tone of voice, “I was not then born.”

Then said the Wolf, “You feed in my pasture.”

“No, good sir,” replied the Lamb, “I have not yet tasted grass.”

Again said the Wolf, “You drink of my well.”

“No,” exclaimed the Lamb, “I never yet drank water, for as yet my mother’s milk is both food and drink to me.”

Upon which the Wolf seized him and ate him up, saying, “Well! I won’t remain supper-less, even though you refute every one of my imputations.”

The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny.


THE BAT AND THE WEASELS

A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life. The Weasel refused, saying that he was by nature the enemy of all birds. The Bat assured him that he was not a bird, but a mouse, and thus was set free. Shortly afterwards the Bat again fell to the ground and was caughtby another Weasel, whom he likewise entreated not to eat him. The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice. The Bat assured him that he was not a mouse, but a bat, and thus a second time escaped.

It is wise to turn circumstances to good account.

Monday, 18 May 2009

Dramedy Music



There is a CD I like listening to because it makes feel good though some lyrics are a bit sad. On the other hand, it also calls for my muse of inspiration and who tells me to write some screenplays. I am writing about Leave The Room, the debut album of Nina McCann.

I've been listening to her music from time to time for years so I decided to interview her. I contacted her manager, Carlos Tilbury, and she agreed on this interview. I thank them for their respectives collaborations.



Shining Desk: What do you do for a living?
Nina McCann: I work for a security distribution company.

SD: Leave The Room is your debut album. How did you feel when it was finally released?
Nina McCann: Relieved! It was hard work and enduring because it was self produced in effect in a small home studio and most importantly I had to learn a lot as recording was totally new to me…so everything on that album was a learning process, writing/recording it was self exploration if you like!

SD: What does music give you?
NM: Feeling, it moves me.

SD: Where do you get inspiration from?
NM: Looking inwards, it’s a wonderful therapy for me, pulling out anything that’s surfacing and perhaps want to have a say…its all very deep isn’t it, by the way I do have a sense of humour :0)

SD: What music do you like?
NM: Anything really that I like the sound of.

SD: Dodgem Music Management is an independent company run by Carlos Tilbury. How did you get support from him?
NM: We’re old friends so it was all set up with the understanding between us that it would act as a body to hopefully protect me and my music.

SD: What is the main purpose with this CD?
NM: To circulate my music globally and achieve some kind of recognition.




SD: I, as a user, usually pay attention to the music and after that I listen to the lyrics. There are different ways of creating a song. You can have a melody come to your mind and then you develop the writing or the other way around. How is your creative process?
NM: Yeah mine is always the music first, it’s the melody first then I build around that, lyrics are always last.

SD: In your song The One I Know on the one hand your music makes me feel good, but, on the other hand, the story seems a bit sad. If I have the story right, it is about a lonely person who wants love. Where were you when this story came to your mind?
NM: Yeah my music is a bit like that, I understand the sadness mixed with the feel good melody sometimes but that’s just how my heart and mind works and I feel that people or the public would understand that life is full of highs and lows know matter how differently each of us chooses to process those feelings through out life. So the song is basically running back to someone…be it friend or lover…but the relationship is a double edge sword.

SD: Which song of Leave The Room do you like most?
NM: Walk on be free.

SD: Is there going to be produced a second album?
NM: Yeah Im working on one right now, its more like an E.P., no title yet!

SD: What would you say to a person who wants to get produced his/her first music record?
NM: Well I was lucky and met someone with a studio, so maybe try to purchase home recording equipment or find a reliable affordable company…easier said than done.

SD: Is there anything else you would like to say?
NM: No not really only to thank everybody that supports me…it means a lot…and thanks to you of course.


© Cristina Fuster Bertrand

Monday, 11 May 2009

Theory of Film: The Birth of a Nation


I wanted to have a post dedicated to this film because of its cinematic innovations, such as camera angles like close-ups, fade-outs or color. Griffith thought about camera angles to tell better the story and not as if it were a play at the theater. On the FilmSite web you can read information about this movie. I just paste here the part related to Griffith techniques:

• the use of ornate title cards
• special use of subtitles graphically verbalizing imagery
• its own original musical score written for an orchestra
• the introduction of night photography (using magnesium flares)
• the use of outdoor natural landscapes as backgrounds
• the definitive usage of the still-shot
• elaborate costuming to achieve historical authenticity and accuracy
• many scenes innovatively filmed from many different and multiple angles
• the technique of the camera "iris" effect (expanding or contracting circular masks to either reveal and open up a scene, or close down and conceal a part of an image)
• the use of parallel action and editing in a sequence (Gus' attempted rape of Flora, and the KKK rescues of Elsie from Lynch and of Ben's sister Margaret)
• extensive use of color tinting for dramatic or psychological effect in sequences
• moving, traveling or "panning" camera tracking shots
• the effective use of total-screen close-ups to reveal intimate expressions
• beautifully crafted, intimate family exchanges
• the use of vignettes seen in "balloons" or "iris-shots" in one portion of a darkened screen
• the use of fade-outs and cameo-profiles (a medium closeup in front of a blurry background)
• the use of lap dissolves to blend or switch from one image to another
• high-angle shots and the abundant use of panoramic long shots
• the dramatization of history in a moving story - an example of an early spectacle or epic film with historical costuming and many historical references (e.g., Mathew Brady's Civil War photographs)
• impressive, splendidly-staged battle scenes with hundreds of extras (made to appear as thousands)
• extensive cross-cutting between two scenes to create a montage-effect and generate excitement and suspense (e.g., the scene of the gathering of the Klan)
• expert story-telling, with the cumulative building of the film to a dramatic climax

You can watch the film below these lines. Enjoy it!








































Thursday, 7 May 2009

Coming soon...

Very soon I'll update this blog with a post dedicated to the film The Birth of a Nation. This film is important because of its innovations in filmmaking.

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails